Troublesome Child

Ever get that feeling, having entered an event weeks in advance, that it was all a horrible mistake? That the upcoming pain will far outweigh the endorphin high?

I go through the same ridiculous process every time, even though, deep down, I’m aware that the chances of enjoying every single moment of the ride – or certainly the feeling after it’s all over – are high.

Fretting is the default position, even when there is entry on the line. There are chimps on both shoulders, arguing the toss over the merits and demerits of racing, while I sit helpless between, like being on the night bus to Peckham when it kicks off. The spat soon gets ugly, but there is no point in intervening. What will be, will be.

It’s the same deal with the magazine. We send off the finished article to the printers, then the doubts set in: what if it isn’t as good as the last issue? How do we know we have got it right having pored over the content for weeks and become blind to its charms?

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The reason struck us is the strange chain of emotions running through the office as we went to press. The editor and myself had concluded issue 36 was not one of our best efforts, and had resigned ourselves to improving next time round. Let it go and move on.

Then the publisher, Bruce, and the ad man, Andy, called us to say it was one of our finest. And the early response from those who had got the issue was the same: it’s a beauty. We are happy to stand corrected.

What the editorial and design team strive for is originality, quality and balance – and it was the balance part we were unsure we had got right. Too much historical and Rouleur becomes a museum piece; all contemporary and we have left our core values behind.It’s not until we get the magazine in our hands, having watched it take shape on a computer screen over the shoulder of our designer, Rob, that we can truly say whether it has worked or not. Thankfully, we all agreed: it has worked, and then some.

And what is contained within the covers of this troublesome child, you ask? Ned Boulting opens with a fabulously written piece on the Revolution track series, with suitably wonderful images by Taz Darling. Guy Andrews, a man with a penchant for a steel frame himself, follows the development of the new Madison Genesis team, who will (whisper it) ride steel frames this season. Retro or forward thinking?

Herbie Sykes, a man who loves a good barney, sits down with Paul Kimmage, not averse to a heated debate himself – ask Lance… It is a fascinating feature on where the sport is now and where it’s heading. Our man Jordan Gibbons goes to Germany to discover one of the finest carbon wheel producers in the world making very expensive hoops from Heath Robinson machinery. And even Lance has to pay to get a set. Superb.

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We have two writers new to Rouleur this issue: Olivier Nilsson-Julien talks to Dutch author Herman Chevrolet about his fascinating book on dirty deals and double-crossing in the peloton; and David Sharp spends time with time trial wunderkind Tony Martin, talking over a year of extreme highs and lows, with the always-excellent Timm Kölln recording the scars.

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David Curry accompanies Rouleur regular photographer Olaf Unverzart to the Czech Republic to discuss cyclo-cross with Zdeněk Štybar as the former World Champion converts to a career on the road with Omega-Pharma –Quick Step.

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Plus columnists Paul Fournel – with Jo Burt’s illustration as usual –  Matt Seaton and William Fotheringham, winners all.

Enough of the hard sell. We’re happy enough, but we’re not the readership. Let us know what you make of it.

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8 Responses to “Troublesome Child”

  1. lafugatravel Says:

    La Fuga is looking forward to this issue!

  2. Jerry Arron Says:

    I assume Kimmage’s fruity parlance will be heavily sub-edited.

  3. brian mcconnell Says:

    No Johnny Green? It is a below-par edition!

  4. Lola Says:

    Sadly, I agree that this was not one of the best editions. Some great articles for sure but far far too much space devoted to the already very well publicised views of one man; that article could have been captured in a single page and the remaining space used for something fresher.

  5. Jakes Says:

    A “good” edition. I’ve stockpiled Rouleurs lately and got through a few in the last few weeks. Also reading a lot of cycling books and Rough Ride is still mentioned in an incredible number considering it was written well over 20 years ago now. Kimmage was ahead of his time, and while the Kimmage-Sykes interview in your current edition can make for uncomfortable, even combative reading at points, it was only fair to print it in the same unedited format that was the case with Pat McQuaid’s interview in edition 26. Keep up the good work!

  6. Bruce McDougall Says:

    Just finished the first two articles. Thought they were terrific. Boulting makes me want to get back on the track. And Herman Chevrolet makes some pretty thought-provoking observations, a welcome change from the tiresome drivel that keeps appearing in more conventional publications. I like this issue!

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